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“Oh, the unspeakable greatness of that exchange,—the Sinless One is condemned, and he who is guilty goes free; the Blessing bears the curse, and the cursed is brought into blessing; the Life dies, and the dead live; the Glory is whelmed in darkness, and he who knew nothing but confusion of face is clothed with glory.” Trailady

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A person God turned around many times.

Thursday, February 21, 2013

The distressed Prince of peace

Hi D_____,

I sent $90. Test question/Answer: Our chastisement/ upon Jesus. I tried to make it “chastisement of our peace”/ “upon the prince of peace” but the Western Union system wouldn’t take that many letters. Jesus, the Prince of peace, took all of the bitterness that drives our peace away. He took that for all of humanity. God focused it all on His Son. And Christ was willing to take it. All of God’s abhorrence for sin and man’s involvement in the great controversy was pressed upon Jesus’ head, as if He were Satan. Leviticus 16:10 says of Azazel, “But the goat, on which the lot fell to be the scapegoat, shall be presented alive before the LORD, to make an atonement with him, and to let him go for a scapegoat into the wilderness.”

This goat, Azazel, represented Satan, who will one day take all of the wrath of God toward his great confrontation with God. He will be accountable for all the souls lost due to his rebellion. We see Azazel’s work in Daniel 8:10,11. Azazel was “the great dragon..., that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan” who cast down the stars from heaven, just like he is seen to do as the little horn of Daniel 8 . (Rev. 12:9). Just as Leviticus 16:10 shows, the final cleansing of the sanctuary in Daniel 8:14 necessitated the punishment of Satan and the earthly system that does his implicit will, for their successful work of leading God’s saints into transgression.

But before that judgment could happen, our Prince of peace must take the bitter gall and wormwood in the hearts of billions on Earth, Satan’s influence that robbed them of the peace that could have been theirs. That was the cup Jesus drank to the dregs.

“Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder.
And He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy.
Then saith He unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with Me.
And He went a little farther, and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, O My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from Me: nevertheless not as I will, but as Thou wilt....
He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O My Father, if this cup may not pass away from Me, except I drink it, Thy will be done....
And He left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words.” (Matt. 26:36-44).

We intimately know our own terrible anxiety that comes from living apart from God. But, to experience billions times as much anxiety is incomprehensible. Yet, that is exactly what God gave His Son so that everyone could have hope that their God would surely have mercy on them. As surely as He diverted His wrath that day from Gethsemane to Golgotha, He will divert it again from the humbled soul seeking His mercy through His Son.

“Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth: my flesh also shall rest in hope. For Thou wilt not leave my soul in hell.” (Ps. 16:9,10). We can escape the anxiety that will kill us because Jesus wouldn’t escape it until it killed Him. He took the death that was ours, that we might have the life that was His.

“He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon Him.” Isaiah 53:5.
Christ was treated as we deserve, that we might be treated as He deserves. He was condemned for our sins, in which He had no share, that we might be justified by His righteousness, in which we had no share. He suffered the death which was ours, that we might receive the life which was His. “With His stripes we are healed.” Desire of Ages, p. 25.

“Oh, the unspeakable greatness of that exchange,—the Sinless One is condemned, and he who is guilty goes free; the Blessing bears the curse, and the cursed is brought into blessing; the Life dies, and the dead live; the Glory is whelmed in darkness, and he who knew nothing but confusion of face is clothed with glory.”—D’Aubigne, London ed., b. 12, ch. 2. Great Controversy, p. 213.

David

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